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Desert Solitaire
by Edward Abbey

The Psychic Soviet

Ian Svenonius
The Psychic Soviet

The Psychic Soviet
Not since TAZ has anyone seen the world as clearly as Ian Svenonius. He perfectly understands and accurately depicts the post-Soviet depression in which the Western world finds itself — a depression in which the global corporate-state monopoly has no enemies left to fight, and so has to create them in order to keep the fetishized post-colonial economy alive. The good old boys have done too well for themselves, and now that they’ve killed off Mother Russia in a condensed Oedipal reversal, they’re getting cagey. Cultural colonialism just hasn’t been as much fun, and it’s harder to rally the troops to defend a Starbucks in Baghdad. Double skinny mocha, lock and load!

The Psychic Soviet

So we manufacture new fetishes. Control consumer demand and you control the economy; control the economy and you control the country. Conquer Afghanistan and cinch control of the recreational narcotics industry. Stormtroopers bring Happy Meals to legless Iraqi children. The danger isn’t failure; the danger is succeeding too quickly. Alexander weeps because there are no worlds left to conquer. At least when Mother was alive, we had someone to impress by blowing all this money.
While Uncle Sam tries to control the economy, the economy becomes self-aware and turns the tables on Uncle. “Feed me, Seymour!” it cries, as Uncle frantically “liberates” nation after nation and tosses them down his darling child’s maw. But the larger The Economy grows, the more He needs to eat, until it gets to where no amount of spent ammunition will satisfy Him. Uncle Sam becomes His willing slave, sacrificing the quality of life of the American populace so that the beast won’t wither.
The Psychic Soviet sees all of this and more. What Svenonious has given us is the mirror in which to groom our modern world. Let us smooth our lapels, straighten our neckties, and find the bravery to do what we must.